Cut calories and sugar with infused water

Posted 8/1/16

The concept of infused water is easy — its simply fruits, vegetables or herbs soaked in pure water.

The trend caught on in recent years. Supermarkets carry brands of it, such as Hint Water — 16 oz. of water with a splash of fruit. Whole …

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Cut calories and sugar with infused water

Posted

The concept of infused water is easy — its simply fruits, vegetables or herbs soaked in pure water.

The trend caught on in recent years. Supermarkets carry brands of it, such as Hint Water — 16 oz. of water with a splash of fruit. Whole Foods Market makes its own, which comes in plastic bottles filled with leafy greens and colorful fruits.

There are even water bottles and pitchers specifically designed for the fad with a center compartment for fruits and veggies.

For those that prefer flavored drinks to plain water, infused water is a healthy alternative packed with nutrients and some flavor.

Because water, medical experts say, is essential for good health.

It makes up 60 percent of a person’s body weight, according to Mayo Clinic, an online nonprofit medical organization.

“Every system in your body depends on water,” it says, “For example, water flushes toxins out of vital organs, carries nutrients to your cells, and provides a moist environment for ear, nose and throat tissues.”

Lack of water can result in dehydration, which can cause decreased energy, headaches and fatigue, Mayo Clinic says.

The general rule of thumb is to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day.

For those who don’t like drinking plain H2O, try adding a glass of infused water.

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