Legend of space

Buzz Aldrin lands at library in Douglas County

Astronaut talks space with families in Highlands Ranch

Posted 10/21/15

Mars is even more interesting when a real-life astronaut is talking about it.

An audience of about 340 people gathered at James H. LaRue Library on Oct. 19 to see Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon.

The evening started with videos …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.
Legend of space

Buzz Aldrin lands at library in Douglas County

Astronaut talks space with families in Highlands Ranch

Posted

Mars is even more interesting when a real-life astronaut is talking about it.

An audience of about 340 people gathered at James H. LaRue Library on Oct. 19 to see Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon.

The evening started with videos and photos of Aldrin on his space missions — Gemini 12 in 1966 and Apollo 11 in 1969 with fellow astronaut Neil Armstrong.

He was accompanied on stage by mission director of Aldrin Enterprises, Christina Korp.

Aldrin, 85, recalled the story of how he got the name “Buzz.”

“My sister pronounced brother as bruzzer,” he said. “So my family called me Buzz for short.”

Edwin Eugene Aldrin Jr. made Buzz his legal first name in the 1980s.

Aldrin also introduced his new children's book, “Welcome to Mars: Making a Home on the Red Planet,” which reads from the point of view of a young astronaut on a mission to Mars.

“Upon landing, Aldrin describes how the first explorers — including the reader — will de-dust themselves, set up camp and begin finding resources,” according to space.com.

Among the audience were five students from STEM Academy. They signed up to volunteer months ago.

“We really want to hear Buzz Aldrin speak,” Sebastian Del Barco said. “And of course we want to meet him.”

Del Barco, a sophomore, is in the engineering program at StEM and aspires to be in the aerospace and aero-economics industries. He and his classmates are currently working on an aerospace intern rocket that tracks things like temperature and pressure about 1,500 feet off the ground.

Students in the engineering program at STEM are interested in building everything from robotics to rockets, said Mike Shallenberger, department of chair for engineering.

And now five of those students can say they've listened to an astronaut speak about the marvels of space.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.