Indoor garage sale draws a crowd

Residents sell at low cost in event at Eastridge

Posted 10/11/17

By 9 a.m. on Oct. 7, the gymnasium of Eastridge Recreation Center was buzzing. People of all ages walked from booth to booth, examining a variety of used, new and one-of-a-kind items.

David Valovage sat behind a table covered with retro Nintendo …

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Indoor garage sale draws a crowd

Residents sell at low cost in event at Eastridge

Posted

By 9 a.m. on Oct. 7, the gymnasium of Eastridge Recreation Center was buzzing. People of all ages walked from booth to booth, examining a variety of used, new and one-of-a-kind items.

David Valovage sat behind a table covered with retro Nintendo games — thick gray tapes that the 32-year-old was introduced to at 10 or 11 years old.

“I’m all about spreading the spirit of retro gaming,” Valovage said.

He was one of dozens of sellers at the Oct. 7 Indoor Garage Sale, hosted by the Highlands Ranch Community Association. For $10, participants get a spot in the gym to sell used or unwanted items: kitchenware, clothes, small furniture, games, books, the list goes on. The HRCA created the event after several requests from residents, said Jamie Noebel, community relations manager.

Each booth has a story.

When Susan Macintosh first moved to the U.S. from Australia, she lived 10 minutes away from Disney Land in California. She started collecting sericels — or animation artwork — of Warner Bros characters, such as Winnie the Pooh and Mickey Mouse. Over time, she realized she had too many. So, Macintosh, who now lives in Highlands Ranch, brought a collection of prints to the indoor garage sale.

“… I don’t have enough walls in my house,” said Macintosh, standing beside her husband. “This is my first time trying to sell them.”

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