Letter to the editor: Something’s missing

Posted 12/4/18

Something’s missing Normally, I wouldn’t have paid much attention to the article about the new chief academic officer for the Douglas County School District, primarily because we no longer have …

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Letter to the editor: Something’s missing

Posted

Something’s missing

Normally, I wouldn’t have paid much attention to the article about the new chief academic officer for the Douglas County School District, primarily because we no longer have school-age children.

After reading the article written by Alex DeWind, I was taken back by the paragraph describing Marlena Gross-Taylor’s background as “being an educator is simply in my blood” and raised in a family filled with teachers, principals — a mother who was a middle school principal and being a nationally recognized speaker are weak credentials for someone with the title as chief academic officer making a salary of $169,000 a year.

I have eight nurses in my extended family. Does that make me qualified to be a nurse… I think not.  As a former Douglas County school teacher and Highlands Ranch resident and taxpayer, I find this incredulous.

This is either a poorly written article or Gross-Taylor does not have the academic credentials for someone in this position. I would have expected at a minimum a notation of a master’s of curriculum development or a doctorates in the same or similar.

The article continues with the fact that the position pays $20,000 to $25,000 less than a deputy superintendent would make, as if that information is suppose to make us feel better about such a high salary. I would like to think that the article is just not as informative as it could have been.

(Editor’s note: Marlena Gross-Taylor has a bachelor of science degree in psychology from Louisiana State University, and a master’s of education in educational leadership and administration from Jones International University, according to her LinkedIn page. She has held the positions of middle school teacher, principal and director of secondary schools.)

Joe Capobianco

Highlands Ranch   

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