Liturgical calendar plays a role in arc of poems

Stephanie Harper’s book covers works she created from 2012-14

Posted 11/14/17

What We Are

“We are all water.

We are cells and vapor.

We are the earth, the sky,

the heat at the center,

and the cold in faraway reaches,

the ones that lie in darkness.

We are made of stars.”

— Stephanie …

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Liturgical calendar plays a role in arc of poems

Stephanie Harper’s book covers works she created from 2012-14

Posted

What We Are

“We are all water.

We are cells and vapor.

We are the earth, the sky,

the heat at the center,

and the cold in faraway reaches,

the ones that lie in darkness.

We are made of stars.”

— Stephanie Harper

Local poet Stephanie Harper, who has just published her first book of poetry, “Sermon Series,” says the poems were written in 2012-2014, in response to sermons and worship experiences, “organized sort of chronologically … (related to) the trajectory of the Lutheran liturgical calendar.” Sections are: “Expectation, Epiphanies and Expression.”

She also speaks of response to growing up in Colorado, with experiences in the natural world — which came through clearly to this reader. (See above example.) And she speaks of influences from parents, aunts and uncles. Her dad is a Colorado native.

Harper, a Littleton resident, is a graduate of Dakota Ridge High School who received her bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Colorado in 2009 and an MFA in creative writing from Fairfield University in Connecticut in 2012. Describing her graduate study experience as “a good set-up for writing,” she says she focused on fiction for her degree, and worked with a “local residency,” which allowed her to spend time mostly in Colorado. Her major focus was on fiction.

Clearly involved in the rhythms of her poetry is a love of singing. “Music is a big hobby.” She sings at her church, Abiding Hope Lutheran, and elsewhere, and has “dabbled” with songwriting-lyrics. “I’m not instrumentally proficient.”

Harper is a freelance editor and writer who works at home, with a particular fondness for editing manuscripts for authors, for publication or self-publication. She also works with academic copy on websites.

Days are filled with “writing, thinking, editing …” Currently working on a personal memoir and “trying to create a novel,” she likes to set a goal of 1,000 words a day for her own work, although she says she’s “not huge on goals, putting pressure on myself …” The memoir deals with health issues — for four years, she has had an ongoing headache.

With family nearby, she is involved with babysitting, her sisters’ husky and other draws, as well as her own creative process and editing jobs.

She has participated in an authors’ event at the Book Bar in Denver’s lively Berkley area (44th and Tennyson) and the book is available from Amazon or her publisher, Finishing Line Press in Georgetown, Kentucky. She’s hoping for opportunities of involvement in workshops and readings.

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