Overtime

Valor aims for new role as member of league

Column by Jim Benton
Posted 10/18/17

Valor Christian has been a success athletically since the school opened in 2007.

On the state championship level alone, the Eagles have won 23 championships with 14 runner-up finishes.

“At Valor we’re always looking at ways that we can do …

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Overtime

Valor aims for new role as member of league

Posted

Valor Christian has been a success athletically since the school opened in 2007.

On the state championship level alone, the Eagles have won 23 championships with 14 runner-up finishes.

“At Valor we’re always looking at ways that we can do things better,” said athletic director Jamie Heiner. “That doesn’t mean how to win more games, that means how do we mentor our kids, how we ensure nobody slips through the cracks, how do we make sure that we are emphasizing spiritual growth and how do we run more efficient practices.

“Everyone knows that talent alone doesn’t win you competitions. We do get some pretty talented kids, but I don’t think we get the talent across the board that everybody assumes we do.”

For a while Valor played as an independent, as the anti-Valor wave gained strength and no leagues would accept the Eagles.

Approval is still pending, but Valor will move up to play in the 5A Jefferson County league for all sports except football in the next two-year cycle.

“That’s our pursuit. It hasn’t officially been passed by the Classification and League Organization Committee and that will be in early November,” said Heiner. “We’ve had great success at the 4A level for a few years.

“That will be a big change for us. We been able to move forward and develop those types of relationships. Through our coaches and administrative staffs, people are seeing who we really are. We’re not perfect. We make mistakes. It shows — those other schools are welcoming us into their leagues.”

Pomona’s athletic director, assistant principal and a dozen athletes visited and talked with Valor last spring and members of the Valor administration and athletes will head to Pomona next winter or spring.

In light of Valor’s achievements, football is the sport that has sparked some resentment from other schools.

It seems the waterfall 5A football league alignments, which will end a fruitless two-year cycle this season, will be changed, adjusted, revamped or whatever you might want to call the final proposal that the football committee will make to the Legislative Council.

So which league the Eagles will play football in remains to be determined.

One thing that is certain is the Valor will not play an independent national schedule as rumored.

“I’ve heard three or four different scenarios,” said Heiner. “We were in the Centennial before. It would make sense that we would go into Jeffco. I’ve heard there are two scenarios that seem more likely where there are six teams in every league and we may end up in a league that has Highlands Ranch schools in it.”

Stay tuned.

Old fashioned softball

Coach Tom Dillingham’s Alameda softball team didn’t qualify for the regional tournaments and will not play in the Oct. 20-21 state tournament, which is too bad for fans wanting to watch old-fashioned-style softball.

The Pirates went 12-7 and finished third in the 4A/3A Colorado 7 League and played small ball with fake bunts, bunts, slap hits and plenty of stolen bases to manufacture runs.

Alameda had 180 stolen bases, which will go down as a state record since standards only go back to 2009 and the previous high was 179 by Burlington in 2014.

“In softball, and it’s no different than baseball, people believe in hitting the long ball and driving the ball,” said Dillingham. “Because I’m an old-school guy I believe in using the skill set you have.

“For the past few years we’ve either had girls that were fast or quick. We used the short game to our advantage. We bunted real well, we fake-bunted well and we slapped real well.

“There’s no team in our league that we didn’t run against. We were, as a team, gap hitters and single hitters. It’s not rocket science that you score easier from second base and third base than first base. We fake-bunt and run. We bunt and run, slap and run. We steal third a lot too.”

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