What to expect this year in Highlands Ranch

Hospital among major changes taking shape in community

Posted 1/2/19

The end of the year is an opportune time for community members to reflect on the past and plan for the future. In Highlands Ranch in 2018, a new development came to life; restaurants closed and …

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What to expect this year in Highlands Ranch

Hospital among major changes taking shape in community

Posted

The end of the year is an opportune time for community members to reflect on the past and plan for the future.

In Highlands Ranch in 2018, a new development came to life; restaurants closed and others filled their spots; residents came and went.

The Highlands Ranch Community Association and the Highlands Ranch Metro District kept the community thriving by hosting dozens of family-friendly events — from jazz concerts at the Highlands Ranch Mansion to food and wine tastings to movies on the lawn of Civic Green Park.

Now, let’s look at what 2019 has in store:

A regional park

The namesake of the Central Park development, a three-acre regional park, is now open for public use, although the restrooms are not open yet. The park is equipped with a gathering space, amphitheater, restrooms and walking trails. To the west is a hub of restaurants, retail stores and exercise studios, and what will soon be the community’s first hospital.

At the center of the park is a 150-foot orange structure — its shape resembles chopsticks — that doubles as a communication tower for the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. At night, the top of the structure glows an electric orange.

Fit Kid

HRCA’s Fitness Department is offering new, drop-in classes for kids ages 4 to 12. Yoga, zumba and cardio classes will be held after school Monday through Thursday from 4:30-5 p.m. at Northridge Recreation Center, 8800 S Broadway.

A drop-in costs $5 for members, $6 for nonmembers. A 10-punch card is $45 for members, $50 for nonmembers. To view the schedule, visit https://bit.ly/2A9YTql.

Fire and emergency services

South Metro Fire Rescue starts serving Highlands Ranch on Jan. 1. In a special election in May, voters approved the merger between the fire district and the Highlands Ranch Metro District, meaning ties would be cut with the Littleton Fire Protection District, which previously serviced the community.

The new partnership brings more stability, a higher level of service, more resources and the construction of a new fire station in the community.

Main Event Entertainment

In November, Highlands Ranch became home to Colorado’s first Main Event Entertainment. A step inside is every kid’s dream, with bright neon lights and the buzz of arcade games. Think Boondock’s in Lone Tree on steroids.

The 50,000-square-foot center, at 103 Centennial Blvd., offers 22 interactive bowling lanes, more than 130 arcade games, a ropes course, laser tag arena, dining area, bar and other family-friendly activities. There are rentable spaces for a variety of events, from birthday parties to celebrations to corporate meetings.

UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital

The community’s first hospital is on track to open in March. UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital brings advanced services closer to home.

The 340,000-square-foot medical campus has enough room for 87 inpatient beds. The facility will have a birth center with C-section operating rooms, a level III neonatal intensive care unit, an intensive care unit with 18 beds and six operating rooms. There will be an emergency department, advanced cardiac services and a cancer center.

The $375 million project will provide 400 permanent jobs at completion, according to UCHealth. Job opportunities are listed at careers.uchealth.org,

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